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Outside The Box Festival Feature: Dressed for the Occasion

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Dressed For The Occasion (Thursday, July 18 at 3:30 p.m. Boston Common, Park Street Stage)

In the summer of 2010, singer Addison Chase came to Boston with plans of completing an acoustic album produced by guitarist Patrick Hopkins. But in a twist of fate, he wound up forming a band with him instead. With the addition of bassist Alex Ferrero and drummer Michael Penney, Dressed for the Occasion was born and ready to rock. Rooted in classics like Johnny Cash, The Beatles, Hank Williams, and The Doors, they create a sound that can only be described as a thunderstorm of originality. Dressed for the Occasion has opened for world renowned acts like The Vibrators and The Hudson Falcons, and played in clubs throughout Boston like The Middle East and T.T. the Bear’s. Before long, they won the Boston Battle of the Bands and were nominated for New Act of the Year by the New England Music Awards. With vocals reminiscent of Eddie Vedder set to hard rocking, rootsy guitar licks, Dressed for the Occasion has earned their place in the Boston spotlight.

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Bostonian Habits

Nova Scotia’s Boston Christmas Tree Tradition

Today’s lesson in not everything in what it seems.

Yesterday afternoon, I was perusing the We Love Beantown Twitter timeline when I came across a post linking to Boston’s Facebook page, noting the departure of the Common’s Christmas tree from its previous home in Nova Scotia.

Is this not America, I thought? I had to share my grievance:

We're getting a Canadian tree for the Common? Nooooooooooooo. http://t.co/6qxNZWIN
@levydr
Dave Levy

It wasn’t long before a friend pointed out that I should check my derision at the door – after all, the tree is part of a nearly half-century long tradition of gratitude from the Nova Scotians.

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Things to Do

Frog Pond: Laser Show an Unnecessary Gimmick

The last time I went to a laser show it was Y2K in DC, I was 11 years-old, and I thought the world was ending.

Naturally, I stopped by the Common last Sunday night to check out the Frog Pond’s end of summer laser show celebration. Though the laser display was more like someone’s screensaver projected on a big screen, vendors served yummy bites – I heard something about strawberry shortcake – and Boston.com’s RadioBDC played lots of U2. It was no Y2K experience, but a great time for families to enjoy one last summer evening together.

But the Frog Pond doesn’t need another gimmick. It doesn’t need lasers. Continue reading